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Hello again, darklings!

Our second Halloween tutorial is my take on Guillermo del Toro’s Crimson Peak and his rusty-looking ghosts. A while ago I brought you a glam look inspired by the beautiful design the DDT team created for del Toro’s films, so this time we’re going to go full ghastly with this recreation. A different take on the classic ghost makeup, it’ll make you stand out from any dead crowd this Halloween. Are you ready?

Image © Universal Pictures.

Step #1: This is going to be a browless look, so we’re going to start by covering those bad boys (if you have to). There are tons of tutorials out there on how to cover up brows but the steps usually go like this: glue your brows up using non-toxic glue stick until they’re flat, wait until it dries, apply another coat of glue, and then powder, and concealer, and they’re gone. Here’s a helpful video by the amazing Jordan Hanz in case you need the visual help. This technique is easier and way less scary than it sounds, I promise!

Once the brows were gone, I applied a layer of KVD’s Lock-It foundation in shade 42 all over the face, dabbing a bit of NYX’s SFX white cream on the high points of the face. These ghosts are really pale but not completely white. The rustiness of the skin gives them a beige tint, so that’s why I combined both products. Once I was happy with the coverage, I powdered the face with NYX’s Studio Finishing powders in translucent and light, using the colored one on the sides of the face and the colorless one on the high points (top of the cheeks, nose, middle of the forehead and chin).

 

Step #2: Time to work on those dead eyes. Apply a rusty red cream base straight onto your lids, covering the whole eye socket with it. Use your fingers to blend it out. I used Necromancy Cosmetica’s Grave Digger lipstick, but if you’re not comfortable using lip products on your eyes, something like a Mac Cream Colour Base or NYX Jumbo Eye Pencil would work, too.

Step #3: With a fluffy brush and a touch of Melt’s Rust begin to intensify that eye socket, blending the edges.

Step #4: With that same blending brush, pack some of Melt’s Rott on the hollows of the eye. We want most of the intensity on the inner and outer corner, as well as under the lower lid where the dark circles would go.

Step #5: Lighten up certain areas by dabbing some touches of Mustard from the Venus 2 palette by Lime Crime and the yellow shade on the Contour Book Vol. 2 by Lunatick Cosmetic Labs. These lighter shades will help us create more dimension under the eye and will give depth to the crease. Use these same yellows to smoke out the outer corner a little and soften the lines.

Step #6: If you’re not naturally blessed with Tom Hiddleston’s bone structure, fret not, we’re about to get there. Ahh, the wonders of contouring!

Start by tracing the general shape of the hollows of your cheeks with Rituel de Fille’s Eclipse and blend it as much as possible. Using a mix of the warm and cool toned shades (no blushes!) from the Lunatick Cosmetic Labs contour book Vol 1, blend over the contour you just placed, concentrating most of the intensity towards the ear. Add the same shades to the sides of your forehead and into your temples, as well as between your brows. If you have trouble blending and want to soften some lines, you can always take a big brush and some of the NYX powders we used before and buff everything together. Don’t be afraid to take your contour a bit further than you usually would. We want that sucked-in effect!

Step #7: Using whatever residue you have on your brush, begin to sketch the placement for a tear on each side. If you’re following the design from the movie like I was, you’ll need to place one a bit more centered and another one more towards the outer corner, but you can always get creative and do your own thing.

Step #8: With a q-tip and Necromancy’s Grave Digger, go over the smokey line you’ve just done and trace the body of the tear. As you can see, no need to be precise here either. The messiness adds to the sense of decay. (Save the q-tip! We’ll be using it later.)

Step #9: With a small lip brush and a touch of OCC’s Lip Tar in Vintage, add some details and a bit of definition. The other shades should peek through behind the red flow, giving the sense of rustiness we’re looking for. Again, if you’re not comfortable using lip products near your eyes, swap out the Lip Tar for a creamy burgundy eye product.

Step #10: Using KVD’s Tattoo Liner in Trooper we’re going to sketch the cracks on the face. To make it look something like broken porcelain, you want to avoid the softness of curved lines as much as possible. Make the streaks sharp and irregular. You can also leave black spaces in between some lines, as if small pieces had fallen out here and there.

Step #11. Details! Once you’re happy with the design, take a small brush and a tiny amount of the shade Lazarus from the Shade and Light Eye Contour palette, and add some dimension to the cracked pieces. Alternate the pieces you want to darken and focus the color on only one half at a time. With the same brush and the shade Skull (white) from the Pastel Goth palette (or a similar white shadow), add some highlights on the oposite sides. This will give depth and volume to the whole design.

With that q-tip from before, add light vertical lines here and there. Dip it in Melt’s Love Sick and repeat the process, this time focusing on the inside of the lips, the sides of the nose and the open wound. Add some more dripping with that OCC’s red Lip Tar, too. A small amount of KVD’s white concealer on a spoolie for the white lashes will be the finishing touch.

Eyes are edited since my eyes don’t like contacts very much, but a pair of yellow/orange contact lenses would do the trick and look much better!

And the look is complete. Hope you guys liked it! Don’t forget to tag us both in your recreations. Oh, and beware of Crimson Peak!

Bex Lecter

Bex Lecter

Spanish Nexus-6 replicant obsessed with makeup, art, coffee, eyebrows and monsters.

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