In the Victorian era, mortality rates were higher and death was a thing one did in one’s home. In contrast to Western society today, mourning prior to the 1900s had a distinct cultural framework. Grief was public, delineated by cultural expectations, and often (to some in our modern culture) macabre. However, it served an important function by giving people time to grieve and process their grief.

While the Georgian era tended more toward the memento mori style of mourning jewelry (the reminder that death came for everyone), Victorian mourning jewelry became more about remembering the dead as loved ones

Modern Vintage Double Chain Memorial Hair Necklace//$435

Today we lack the framework in which to process our grief. After the funeral, we are expected to move on with life and go back to the way things were. People who mourn are expected to get over it and there is no place in our society for the space needed to acknowledge and remember those whose passing has left tears in the fabric of our reality.

Enter Wisp Adornments.

The shop’s owner, Angela Kirkpatrick, creates custom-made memento mori pieces for both pets and people. Her jewelry incorporates hair or ashes and, while Etsy’s policies don’t allow her to create jewelry from ashes, she can be contacted outside of Etsy (via email) for that purpose.
Many of the jewelry pieces in her store are one of a kind or for display only, as she creates custom jewelry for each project, helping people find ways to commemorate their dead loved ones and pets.
wisp
“From the moment we are born, we begin to die.” Nascentes Morimur Necklace//$265
Mourning is important and we need to find new ways to do it in a healthy fashion. Or perhaps the old ways will work just as well.
As long as we remember.
You can shop Wisp Adornments on Etsy and keep up with them on Facebook.
Vivian Caethe

Vivian Caethe

When not fighting crime or tinkering with Tarot spreads, Vivian Caethe writes weird fiction, science fiction, fantasy, quirky nonfiction and everything in between. She also crafts, crochets, and goes on long quests to find the perfect knitting pattern. She lives in Colorado with a super villain cat. She can be found as a writer at VivianCaethe.com and as an editor at WordsMadeBeautiful.net.

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